The form Jehovah is of late medieval origin; it is a combination of the consonants of the Divine Name and
the vowels attached to it by the Masoretes but belonging to an entirely different word. The sound of Y is
represented by J and the sound of W by V, as in Latin.

The Masoretes, Jewish biblical scholars of the Middle Ages, replaced the vowel signs that had appeared above
or beneath the consonants of YHWH with the vowel signs of Adonai or of Elohim. Thus, the artificial name
Jehovah  came into being. Although Christian scholars after the Renaissance and Reformation periods used the
term Jehovah for YHWH, in the 19th and 20th centuries biblical scholars again began to use the form Yahweh.
Early Christian writers 50 CE-250 CE (AD), Such as *Clement of Alexandria in the 2nd century, had used
the form Yahweh
, thus this pronunciation of the Tetragrammaton was never really lost. Greek transcriptions
also indicated that Yhwh Should be pronounced Yahweh." Encyclopedia Britannica (Micropedia, vol. 10)
In the Hebrew Bible the Jews wrote the consonants of the Tetragrammaton as YHWH, but out of reverence for the sacred name
of God (or out of fear of violating Exod. 20:7; Lev. 24:16), they vocalized and pronounced it as Adonai or occasionally as Elohim.
It is unfortunate, then, that the name was transliterated into German and ultimately into English as Jehovah (which is the way the
name is represented in the American Standard Version of 1901), for this conflate form represents the vowels of Adonai
superimposed on the consonants of Yahweh, and it was never intended by the Jews to be read as Yehowah (or Jehovah).

The Jewish Encyclopedia explains the word Jehovah in a similar way. http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com (25/9/2005)
The first time the Tetragrammaton appeared in an English Bible was on the title page of William Tyndale's Bible translation of
1525, where it was written as Iehouah. This was an interlace of YHVH and Adonai. The King James Version also originally used
Iehouah, influenced by the Ben Chayim codex. The King James Bible changed the spelling to Jehovah for the 1762-1769 edition.

Combining YHWH with Adonai is referred to as interlacing, fusing or superimposing. It could hardly be considered accurate or
respectful. The illogical fusion of the sacred Name with the vowel points of another name is shown in the preface to The J.B.
Rotherham Emphasized Bible:
In the Stromata Clement of Alexandria wrote that "The mystic name which is called the Tetragrammaton...is pronounced ιαουε" 1 . This is a
transliteration of the Hebrew word יהוה (the Tetragrammaton), used by the Jews to represent the ineffable name of God. Interestingly, in
transliterating a Hebrew word consisting of four consonants and no vowels, Clement used five vowels and no consonants, though many
scholars argue that the iota at the beginning and the omicron-upsilon combination in the middle should be read as semi-vowels or
consonantalized vowels, yielding the pronunciation Yahweh. Clement defines the name as meaning "Who is and shall be".
Shalom and welcome to YHWH and Yah pages, home in Jerusalem Israel, of Rabbi's and Saints of God:

To determine how HIS MIGHTY name was pronounced we should digest three conclusions. Also keep in mind, religions, pronucnicatins, and concepts are
in a constant evolution, as well as holy revelation is progressive and is progressive even concerning our present days. Scripture is always
veiwed different in every century as time and histroy confirm the evidence of prophecids meaning.  Now, we understand in part, but when Messiah comes,
we will understand in full.

3 things to understand how to prounce his name:
1)  How did the rabbis and the Cohen (Priest) in the time of the first and second temple proclaim HIS name?
2)  In the time of 400 BCE to 400 CE there was much literature written by Jews, Sumeria, Historieans, Chistains and Greeks concering the pronuccaiont
then.
3)  What is the gramatical essense, , in a Holy and sacred maner, Three things must be acknowledgeSamaritans.
4) How the saddikim and rabbinm would it today,
5  how NOT TO PROUCNE IT!

The findings, or evidence of the above, does not harm, those who have other interpretations such as Jehovah or Yehovah. It is understood, that different
languages and cultures have different sounds and are interpeted thus. Chinese people for example, have a difficult time prouncouin the "TH" sound,
because there is nothing in comparriasion in thier proucnucaition. So the thank you becomes sank you! In the reverse, you try, assuming your not east
asian, try to say toilet in Chinese, your in for a great surprise. In as much as Christians fight over the ponuctionation of how Jesus (Yeshusha) should be
said, as well, there should be no condemnation on those who used a slightly different varient. See Rabbi;s Segal story video here.
I am sure God knows, when your talking to Him, and He knows your every downfall, sin and imperfection. He is there to listen to your heart, not
your prised proud intellect.

1) Names of Early Prisethood, Rabbi's in Temple service talking about the use of his name:



2)Other extracurival sources, Historieans, Greeks, and Chruch history:

3) Explanation of grammer for the name.
4) General rule of how it is prounced today by the sadikim of rabbinm.

The Samaritans shared many identical stories concerning creation and names with us Jews, including about the utterance of a sacred name.

From our ancient talmudic sources, the book of Sanhedrin 10:1 includes the comment of Rabbi Mana "for example those Kutim who take an oath" would
also have no share in the world to come, which suggests that Rabbi Mana thought some Samaritans used the name in making oaths. (Their priests had
preserved a liturgical pronunciation "Yahwe" or "Yahwa" to the present day.)[57] As with Jews, the Aramaic ha-Shema (השמא "the Name") remains the
everyday usage of the name among Samaritans, akin to Hebrew "the Name" (Hebrew השם "HaShem").[50]
Septuagint
Main article: Septuagint manuscripts#Treatment of the Tetragrammaton in Septuagint manuscripts

The oldest complete Septuagint (Greek Old Testament) versions, from around the 2nd century CE, consistently use Κυριος ("Lord"), where the Hebrew
has YHWH, corresponding to substituting Adonay for YHWH in reading the original; in books written in Greek in this period (e.g., Wisdom, 2 and 3
Maccabees), as in the New Testament, Κυριος takes the place of the name of God. However, older fragments contain the name YHWH.[citation needed]
[58] In the P. Ryl. 458 (perhaps the oldest extant Septuagint manuscript) there are blank spaces, leading some scholars to believe that the
Tetragrammaton must have been written where these breaks or blank spaces are.[59]

Sidney Jellicoe concluded that "Kahle is right in holding that LXX [Septuagint] texts, written by Jews for Jews, retained the Divine Name in Hebrew Letters
(palaeo-Hebrew or Aramaic) or in the Greek-letters imitative form ΠΙΠΙ, and that its replacement by Κύριος was a Christian innovation".[60] Jellicoe draws
together evidence from a great many scholars (B. J. Roberts, Baudissin, Kahle and C. H. Roberts) and various segments of the Septuagint to draw the
conclusions that the absence of "Adonai" from the text suggests that the insertion of the term Kyrios was a later practice; in the Septuagint Kyrios is used
to substitute YHWH; and the Tetragrammaton appeared in the original text, but Christian copyists removed it.[citation needed]

Eusebius and Jerome (translator of the Latin Vulgate) used the Hexapla. Both attest to the importance of the sacred Name and that some manuscripts of
Septuagint contained the Tetragrammaton in Hebrew letters.[citation needed][61] This is further affirmed by The New International Dictionary of New
Testament Theology, which states "Recently discovered texts doubt the idea that the translators of the LXX (Septuagint) have rendered the
Tetragrammaton JHWH with KYRIOS. The most ancient mss (manuscripts) of the LXX today available have the Tetragrammaton written in Hebrew letters
in the Greek text. This was custom preserved by the later Hebrew translator of the Old Testament in the first centuries (after Christ)"[62]
Dead Sea Scrolls

The Dead Sea Scrolls and other Hebrew and Aramaic texts write (only) the tetragrammaton in paleo-Hebrew script, showing that the name was treated
specially.[63] A Greek fragment of Leviticus (26:2-16) discovered in the Dead Sea scrolls (Qumran) has ιαω ("Iao"), the Greek form of the Hebrew
trigrammaton YHW.[64] The historian John the Lydian (6th century) wrote: "The Roman Varo [116–27 BCE] defining him [that is the Jewish god] says that
he is called Iao in the Chaldean mysteries". (De Mensibus IV 53) Van Cooten mentions that Iao is one of the "specifically Jewish designations for God"
and "the Aramaic papyri from the Jews at Elephantine show that 'Iao' is an original Jewish term".[65][66]
Patristic writings
The tetragrammaton as represented in stained glass in an 1868 Episcopal Church in Iowa
Petrus Alfonsi's early 12th-century Tetragrammaton-Trinity diagram, rendering the name as "JEVE"

According to the Catholic Encyclopedia (1910) and B.D. Eerdmans:[67][68]

Diodorus Siculus (1st century BCE) writes[69] Ἰαῶ (Iao);
Irenaeus (d. c. 202) reports[70] that the Gnostics formed a compound Ἰαωθ (Iaoth) with the last syllable of Sabaoth. He also reports[71] that the
Valentinian heretics use Ἰαῶ (Iao);
Clement of Alexandria (d. c. 215)[72] writes Ἰαοὺ (Iaou)—see also below;
Origen of Alexandria (d. c. 254), Ἰαώ (Iao);[73]
Porphyry (d. c. 305) according to Eusebius (died 339),[74] Ἰευώ (Ieuo);
Epiphanius (died 404), who was born in Palestine and spent a considerable part of his life there, gives Ἰά (Ia) and Ἰάβε (Iabe) and explains Ἰάβε as
meaning He who was and is and always exists.[75]
(Pseudo-)Jerome (4th/5th century),[76] (tetragrammaton) can be read Iaho;
Theodoret (d. c. 457) writes Ἰαώ (Iao);[77] he also reports[78] that the Samaritans say Ἰαβέ or Ἰαβαί (both pronounced at that time /ja'vε/), while the Jews
say Ἀϊά (Aia).[79] (The latter is probably not יהוה but אהיה Ehyeh = "I am " or "I will be", Exod. 3:14 which the Jews counted among the names of God.)
James of Edessa (died 708),[80] Jehjeh;
Jerome (died 420)[81] speaks of certain Greek writers who misunderstood the Hebrew letters יהוה (read right-to-left) as the Greek letters ΠΙΠΙ (read left-to-
right), thus changing YHWH to pipi.

A window featuring the Hebrew tetrgrammaton יְהֹוָה in St. Charles's Church, Vienna.
Christianity

It is assumed that early Jewish Christians inherited from Jews the practice of reading "Lord" where the tetragrammaton appeared in the Hebrew text, or
where a tetragrammaton may have been marked in a Greek text. Gentile Christians, primarily non-Hebrew speaking and using Greek texts, may
have read "Lord" as it occurred in the Greek text of the New Testament and their copies of the Greek Old Testament. This practice continued into the
Latin Vulgate where "Lord" represented "Yahweh" in the Latin text. In Petrus Alphonsi's Tetragrammaton-Trinity diagram, the name is written as "Jeve." At
the Reformation, the Luther Bible restored "Jehova" in the German text of Luther's Old Testament.[82]
Christian translations
Tetragrammaton at the 5th Chapel of the Palace of Versailles, France. This example has the vowel points of "Elohim".

The Septuagint (Greek translation) and Vulgate (Latin translation) use the word "Lord" (κύριος, kyrios, and dominus, respectively).

The New Jerusalem Bible (1966) uses "Yahweh" exclusively.
The Bible In Basic English (1949/1964) uses "Yahweh" eight times, including Exod. 6:2.
The New English Bible (NT 1961, OT 1970) generally uses the word "LORD" but uses "JEHOVAH" several times.[83] For examples of both forms, see
Exodus Chapter 3 and footnote to verse 15.
The Amplified Bible (1954/1987). At Exod. 6:3 the AB says "but by My name the Lord [Yahweh--the redemptive name of God] I did not make Myself known
to them."
The Living Bible (1971). "Jehovah" or "Lord".[84]
The Young's Literal Translation (Version) – "Jehovah" since Genesis 2:4
The Holman Christian Standard Bible (1999/2002) uses "Yahweh" over 50 times, including Exod. 6:2.
The World English Bible (WEB) [a Public Domain work with no copyright] uses "Yahweh" some 6837 times.
The New Living Translation (1996/2004) uses "Yahweh" eight times[verification needed], including Exod. 6:2. The Preface of the New Living Translation:
Second Edition says that in a few cases they have used the name Yahweh (for example 3:15; 6:2–3).
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible retains "Yahweh" throughout the Old Testament.
The Anchor Bible retains "Yahweh" throughout the Old Testament.
The King James Version. Rendered in seven instances as "Jehovah", i.e. four times as the name of God, Exod. 6:3; Psalm 83:18; Isa 12:2; 26:4,
and three times where it is included in Hebrew place-names e.g. "Jehovah-jireh" -Gen 22:14. (See also Ex 17:15; Judges 6:24)
Note: Elsewhere in the KJV, "LORD" is generally used. But in verses such as Gen 15:2; 28:13, Psalm 71:5, Amos 1:8, 9:5 etc. where this practice would
result in 'Lord LORD' (Hebrew: Adonay YHWH) or 'LORD Lord' (YHWH Adonay) the KJV translates the Hebrew text as 'Lord GOD' or 'LORD God'.
The American Standard Version uses "Jehovah".
The New World Translation uses Jehovah over 7,000 times in translations of both the Hebrew and Greek scriptures.

New Testament
Main article: Tetragrammaton in the New Testament

Since the Tetragrammaton does not appear in the Greek manuscripts of the New Testament, virtually all translations refrain from inserting it into the
English. The vast majority of New Testament translations therefore render the Greek kyrios as "Lord" or "lord", and theos as "God". Nevertheless, the
Sacred Scriptures Bethel Edition inserts the name Yahweh in the New Testament, while the New World Translation inserts the name Jehovah in the New
Testament.

The main notable exception is Delitzsch's translation of the New Testament into Hebrew (1877) which frequently uses the tetragrammaton, i.e. Hebrew
(יְהֹוָה), particularly in verses where the New Testament quotes or makes reference to Old Testament texts. It is however still read aloud as "Adonai"
by most Hebrew-speaking Christians in Israel.[citation needed]
Catholicism
The Tetragrammaton on the Tympanum of the Roman Catholic Basilica of St. Louis, King of France in Missouri

|
Yǝhwih
|
|Here, the dot over the holam/waw is omitted, and the hataf segol gets reverted to a shewa.
|
'''''' is the pronounced form of plain shewa+.

The ''o'' diacritic dot over the letter waw is often omitted because it plays no useful role in distinguishing between the two intended pronunciations Adonai
and Elohim (which both happen to have an ''o'' vowel in the same position).

Yeho or "Yehō-" is the prefix form of "YHWH" used in Hebrew theophoric name+s; the suffix form "Yahū" or "-Yehū" is just as common. This has caused
two opinions:

# In former times (at least from c.1650 CE), the prefix pronunciation "Yehō-" was sometimes connected with the full pronunciation "Yehova" derived from
combining the Masoretic vowel points for "Adonai" with the consonantal Tetragrammaton YHWH.
# Recently that, as "Yahweh" is likely an imperfective+ verb form, "Yahu" is its corresponding preterite+ or jussive+ short form: compare '''' (preterit or
jussive short form) = "do obeisance".

Those who argue for argument 1 above are: George Wesley Buchanan+ in ''Biblical Archaeology Review+''; Smith's 1863 ''A Dictionary of the Bible'';
Section # 2.1 ''The Analytical Hebrew and Chaldee Lexicon'' (1848) in its article .

Smith's 1863 ''A Dictionary of the Bible'' says that "Yahweh" is possible because shortening to "Yahw" would end up as "Yahu" or similar. The Jewish
Encyclopedia of 1901–1906 in the Article:Names Of God has a very similar discussion, and also gives the form Yo (). The Encyclopædia Britannica also
says that "Yeho-" or "Yo" can be explained from "Yahweh", and that the suffix "-yah" can be explained from "Yahweh" better than from "Yehovah".


Genizah

to support the view that the Tetragrammaton was at one time spoken in Ancient Israel+, the way it is written: "...this is My name for ever, and this is My
memorial unto all generations." The term "for ever" is ''le'olam'', which in biblical Hebrew means "always, continually".

Maimonides+ relates that only the priests in Temple in Jerusalem+ pronounced the Tetragrammaton, when they re Since the destruction of Second
Temple of Jerusalem+ in 70 CE, the Tetragrammaton is no longer pronounced. Rabbinical sources indicate that there was an exception for the temple
liturgy, where the name of God was only pronounced once a year, by the high priest, on the Day of Atonement+. Others argue that the name was also
pronounced in the liturgy+ of the Temple+ in the priest+ly benediction+ (Num. vi. 27) after the regular daily sacrifice, while in the synagogue+s
a substitute (probably Adonai) was used.

Some time after the destruction of Solomon's Temple+, the spoken use of God's name, as it was written, had ceased even though knowledge of how
it was pronounced was perpetuated in rabbinic schools.

The vehemence with which the utterance of the name is denounced in the Mishna+ suggests that use of Yahweh was unacceptable in rabbinical Judaism.
"He who pronounces the Name with its own letters has no part in the world to come!" Such is the prohibition of pronouncing the Name as written that it is
sometimes called the "Ineffable", "Unutterable" or "Distinctive Name".

Halakha+ (Jewish Law) prescribes that whereas the Name written ''yud-hei-vav-hei'', it is only to be pronounced "Adonai;" and the latter name too is
regarded as a holy name, and is only to be pronounced in prayer."They [the Priests, when reciting the Priestly Blessing, when the Temple stood] re Thus
when someone wants to refer in third person to either the written or spoken Name, the term ''"HaShem+"'' ("the Name") is used;Stanley S. Seidner,"
HaShem: Uses through the Ages." Unpublished paper, Rabbinical Society Seminar, Los Angeles, CA,1987. and this handle itself can also be used in
prayer. The Masoretes+ added vowel points (niqqud+) and cantillation+ marks to the manuscripts to indicate vowel usage and for use in ritual chanting of
readings from the Bible+ in synagogue+ services+. To they added the vowels for "" ("My Lord"), the word to use when the text was read. While "HaShem"
is the most common way to reference "the Name," the terms "HaMaqom" (lit. "The Place," i.e. "The Omnipresent") and "Raḥmana" (Aramaic, "Merciful")
are used in the mishna+ and gemara+, still used in the phrases "HaMaqom y'naḥem ethḥem" ("may The Omnipresent console you"), the traditional
phrase used in the Jewish mourning house+ and "Raḥmana l'tzlan" ("may the Merciful save us" i.e. "God forbid").

The written Tetragrammaton, as well as six other names of God, must be treated with special sanctity. They cannot be disposed of regularly, lest they be
desecrated, but are usually put in long term storage or buried in Jewish cemeteries in order to retire them from use. Similarly, it is prohibited to write the
Tetragrammaton (or these other names) unnecessarily. In order to guard the sanctity of the Name sometimes a letter is substituted by a different letter in
writing (e.g. יקוק), or the letters are separated by one or more hyphens.

Some Jews are stringent and extend the above safeguard by also not writing out other names of God in other languages, for example writing "God" in
English as written "G-d," and so forth. However this is beyond the letter of the law.

The Samaritan+s shared the taboo of the Jews about the utterance of the name, and there is no evidence that its pronunciation was common Samaritan
practice. However Sanhedrin 10:1 includes the comment of Rabbi Mana+ "for example those Kutim+ who take an oath" would also have no share in the
world to come+, which suggests that Mana thought some Samaritans used the name in making oaths. (Their priests have preserved a liturgical
pronunciation "Yahwe" or "Yahwa" to the present day.) As with Jews, the Aramaic ''ha-Shema'' (השמא "the Name") remains the everyday usage of the
name among Samaritans, akin to Hebrew "the Name" (Hebrew השם "HaShem").

Septuagint manuscripts#Treatment of the Tetragrammaton in Septuagint manuscripts

The oldest complete Septuagint+ (Greek+ Old Testament) versions, from around the 2nd century CE, consistently use In the P. Ryl. 458+ (perhaps the
oldest extant Septuagint+ manuscript) there are blank spaces, leading some scholars to believe that the Tetragrammaton must have been written where
these breaks or blank spaces are.

Sidney Jellicoe+ concluded that "Kahle+ is right in holding that LXX [Septuagint] texts, written by Jews for Jews, retained the Divine Name in
Hebrew Letters (palaeo-Hebrew or Aramaic) or in the Greek-letters imitative form ''ΠΙΠΙ'', and that its replacement by ''Κύριος'' was a Christian innovation".
Jellicoe draws together evidence from a great many scholars (B. J. Roberts, Baudissin, Kahle and C. H. Roberts) and various segments of the Septuagint
to draw the conclusions that the absence of "Adonai" from the text suggests that the insertion of the term ''Kyrios'' was a later practice; in the Septuagint
''Kyrios'' is used to substitute YHWH; and the Tetragrammaton appeared in the original text, but Christian copyists removed it.

Eusebius+ and Jerome+ (translator of the Latin Vulgate+) used the Hexapla+. This is further affirmed by The New International Dictionary of New
Testament Theology, which states "Recently discovered texts doubt the idea that the translators of the LXX (Septuagint) have rendered the
Tetragrammaton JHWH with KYRIOS. The most ancient mss (manuscripts) of the LXX today available have the Tetragrammaton written in Hebrew letters
in the Greek text. This was custom preserved by the later Hebrew translator of the Old Testament in the first centuries (after Christ)"

The Dead Sea Scrolls+ and other Hebrew and Aramaic texts write (only) the tetragrammaton in paleo-Hebrew script+, showing that the name was treated
specially. A Greek fragment of Leviticus (26:2-16) discovered in the Dead Sea scrolls (Qumran) has ιαω ("Iao+"), the Greek form of the Hebrew
trigrammaton YHW. The historian John the Lydian+ (6th century) wrote: "The Roman Varo+ [116–27 BCE] defining him [that is the Jewish god] says that
he is called Iao in the Chaldean mysteries". (De Mensibus IV 53) Van Cooten mentions that Iao is one of the "specifically Jewish designations for God"
and "the Aramaic papyri from the Jews at Elephantine show that 'Iao' is an original Jewish term".



According to the Catholic Encyclopedia+ (1910) and B.D. Eerdmans:
* Diodorus Siculus+ (1st century BCE) writes (Iao);
* Irenaeus+ (d. c. 202) reports that the Gnostics formed a compound (Iaoth) with the last syllable of Sabaoth+. He also reports that the Valentinian
heretics+ use (Iao);
* Clement of Alexandria+ (d. c. 215) writes (Iaou)—see also below;
* Origen of Alexandria+ (d. c. 254), (Iao);
* Porphyry+ (d. c. 305) according to Eusebius+ (died 339), (Ieuo);
* Epiphanius+ (died 404), who was born in Palestine and spent a considerable part of his life there, gives (Ia) and (Iabe) and explains Ἰάβε as meaning He
who was and is and always exists.
* (Pseudo-)Jerome+ (4th/5th century), ''(tetragrammaton) can be read Iaho'';
* Theodoret+ (d. c. 457) writes (Iao); he also reports that the Samaritans+ say or (both pronounced at that time /ja'vε/), while the Jews say (Aia). (The
latter is probably not but Ehyeh+ = "I am " or "I will be", which the Jews counted among the names of God.)
* James of Edessa+ (died 708), Jehjeh;
* Jerome+ (died 420) speaks of certain Greek writers who misunderstood the Hebrew letters (read right-to-left) as the Greek letters (read left-to-right),
thus changing YHWH to ''pipi''.



It is assumed that early Jewish Christians inherited from Jews the practice of reading "Lord" where the tetragrammaton appeared in the Hebrew text, or
where a tetragrammaton may have been marked in a Greek text. Gentile Christians, primarily non-Hebrew speaking and using Greek texts, may
have read "Lord" as it occurred in the Greek text of the New Testament+ and their copies of the Greek Old Testament+. This practice continued into the
Latin Vulgate+ where "Lord" represented "Yahweh" in the Latin text. In Petrus Alphonsi+'s Tetragrammaton-Trinity diagram, the name is written as "Jeve."
At the Reformation, the Luther Bible+ restored "Jehova" in the German text of Luther's Old Testament.



The Septuagint+ (Greek translation) and Vulgate+ (Latin translation) use the word "Lord" (, ''kyrios'', and , respectively).

* The New Jerusalem Bible+ (1966) uses "Yahweh" exclusively.
* The Bible In Basic English+ (1949/1964) uses "Yahweh" eight times, including .
* The New English Bible+ (NT 1961, OT 1970) generally uses the word " " but uses "JEHOVAH" several times. For examples of both forms, see Exodus
Chapter 3 and footnote to verse 15.
* The Amplified Bible+ (1954/1987). At the AB says "but by My name the Lord [Yahweh--the redemptive name of God] I did not make Myself known to
them."
* The Living Bible+ (1971). "Jehovah" or "Lord".
* The Young's Literal Translation+ (Version) – "Jehovah" since Genesis 2:4
* The Holman Christian Standard Bible+ (1999/2002) uses "Yahweh" over 50 times, including .
* The World English Bible+ (WEB) [a Public Domain work with no copyright] uses "Yahweh" some 6837 times.
* The New Living Translation+ (1996/2004) uses "Yahweh" eight times, including . The Preface of the New Living Translation: Second Edition says that in
a few cases they have used the name Yahweh (for example 3:15; 6:2–3).
* Rotherham's Emphasized Bible+ retains "Yahweh" throughout the Old Testament.
* The Anchor Bible+ retains "Yahweh" throughout the Old Testament.
* The King James Version+. Rendered in seven instances as "Jehovah", i.e. four times as the name of God, ; Psalm 83+:18; Isa 12:2; 26:4, and three
times where it is included in Hebrew place-names e.g. "Jehovah-jireh" -Gen 22:14. (See also Ex 17:15; Judges 6:24)
** Note: Elsewhere in the KJV, " " is generally used. But in verses such as Gen 15:2; 28:13, Psalm 71:5, Amos 1:8, 9:5 etc. where this practice
would result in 'Lord ' (Hebrew: ''Adonay YHWH'') or ' Lord' (''YHWH Adonay'') the KJV translates the Hebrew text as 'Lord ' or ' God'.
* The American Standard Version+ uses "Jehovah".
* The New World Translation+ uses Jehovah over 7,000 times in translations of both the Hebrew and Greek scriptures.

GENDER: Masculine
USAGE: Theology
PRONOUNCED: YAH-way   [key]
Meaning & History
A name of the Hebrew God, represented in Hebrew by the tetragrammaton ("four letters") יהוה (Yod Heh Vav Heh), transliterated into
Roman script Y H W H. Because it was considered blasphemous to utter the name of God it was only written and never spoken. This
resulted in the pronunciation being hidden or lost. The name originally derived from the old Semitic root הוה (hawah) meaning "to be" or
"to become".

After four  generations of Rabbinic thoughts in Israel today (2014) There seems to be miminal conflict as to pronounce debate as to
Yahweh's believed to be name. Using sources of the Tannaim rabbinics and Greek sources, they remain somewhat consistent on the
"Would be" pronunciation if they could say his HOLY NAME, but this is forbidden in most cases. Today Y-H-V-H is
THE NAME OF THE LORD